Nepalhilfe Beilngries e.V.

23 Jahre Nepalhilfe Beilngries e.V.
deutschenglisch

15.05.2015

article: Ralf Dujmovits, photos: Ralf Dujmovits and Nepalhilfe Beilngries

Ralf Dujmovits
Ralf Dujmovits
The team of NHB with Sunil Shresta (2nd left and Sabina Parajuli right)
The team of NHB with Sunil Shresta (2nd left and Sabina Parajuli right)
The school in Thulosirubari must be rebuilt
The school in Thulosirubari must be rebuilt

Nearly three weeks have passed since the first heavy earth quake in Nepal which was followed by a second one a few days ago. The effects have been disastrous for the people in this poverty stricken country. Buildings which had withstood the first earth quake were destroyed by the second one, which is also true for several projects of NHB.  Meanwhile NHB have already brought approximately 60 tons of food and medicine into Sindhupalchok District, where the majority of their schools are, respectively were. More than 8,000 died and 16,000 got injured. These numbers are still not the top of the iceberg.

The German extreme-climber Ralf Dujmovits, who has been together with his wife Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner a close friend and supporter of NHB for many years, has sent a travel report, which gives first-hand impressions of the situation of the Nepali population and the work of NHB.

Dear Friends,

one of the most upsetting days of my travel lies behind me. Some days ago, we went to Sindhupalchok District together with the team of NHB-practitioners. This district and Gorkha are the most heavily destroyed areas in Nepal. Most of their schools were there – today many of them destroyed – as well as 85-95% of all houses of the local population.

A team of six practitioners of Siddhi Memorial Hospital was accompanied by three nurses and some more assistants to make their way in the surrounding villages to render first aid. This team was led by Sabina Parajuli, a former pupil of the school in Sangachok, which is one of the early school projects of NHB. NHB financially supported this intelligent young woman with her medical studies.

When we reached Sangachok, her parents welcomed us. Their house is entirely broken. This little village alone counts 200 dead people. Within minutes many patients came and received free treatment. More than 300 people came that day. We handed out surgical masks, soap, tooth brushes and toothpaste. Some days ago, NHB delivered rice and wheat. Later on, Sabina showed me “her” school. I was allowed to film an interview in which she pled for financial support. Her school will be torn down because of the sever damages.

We drove on to Irkhu, a little village on a hill. NHB built a little school there from 2000 to 2002 with my financial support, which had continuously been expanded the last couple of years and didn’t get destroyed as if by a miracle. The local police force has made their headquarters there as nearly none of the surrounding houses is intact - a terrible view. Almost eighty patients received medical treatment by the practitioners and nurses.

Our next stop was Thulosirubari, where the former president of NHB, Karl Rebele, Gerlinde and I opened the new school in 2009. The number of formerly 550 children attending that school has risen to 700 today. Fortunately, the day of the earth quake was a Saturday and the school was closed. The ground floor had broken into pieces and so the two and a half upper floors came down, too. I used to be so proud of “our” school. The building must be torn down and rebuilt anew. 

When we were driving on to the main town of Sindhupalchok District, Chautara, we mainly saw ruins. The school of the Austrian section of NHB has not been destroyed completely but has enormous damages. A structural engineer will decide in the next couple of days whether the school can be reconstructed. A very exhausting day for the medical staff came to an end. Originally we had planned to visit the new LOWA-School, which is in construction at the moment, but we were all too tired.

Every second day the Nepali team of NHB and of Siddhi Memorial Hospital are on tour. Hardly to imagine how much they must take during these days. People are sitting in front of their houses being heavily traumatised and waiting for the monsoon to come. 

We see it as our task to work hard for the future fund raising here in Germany by showing photos and videos - especially when the country and its population disappear out of the focus of media and world public. Nepal will need our help for many years. The friendly and happy Nepali as we know will hopefully come back soon.

Ralf Dujmovits